From Origin

Researchers from University of Sao Paulo Detail New Studies and Findings in the Area of Climate Change

Researchers from University of Sao Paulo Detail New Studies and Findings in the Area of Climate Change (Carbon dioxide fertilization offsets negative impacts of climate change on Arabica coffee yield in Brazil)

Research findings on Climate Change are discussed in a new report. According to news originating from Piracicaba, Brazil, by VerticalNews correspondents, research stated, ” Arabica coffee production provides a livelihood to millions of people worldwide. Climate change impact studies consistently project a drastic decrease of Arabica yields in current production regions by 2050.”

Our news journalists obtained a quote from the research from the University of Sao Paulo, “However, none of these studies incorporated the beneficial effects that elevated CO2 concentrations are found to have on Arabica coffee yields, the so-called CO2 fertilization effect. To assess the impacts of climate change and elevated CO2 concentrations on the cultivation of Arabica coffee in Brazil, a coffee yield simulation model was extended with a CO2 fertilization and irrigation factor. The model was calibrated and validated with yield data from 1989 to 2013 of 42 municipalities in Brazil and found to perform satisfactorily in both the calibration (R (2) = 0.91, d = 0.96, mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) = 8.58%) and validation phases (R (2) = 0.96, d = 0.95, MAPE = 11.16%). The model was run for the 42 municipalities from 1980 to 2010 with interpolated climate data and from 2040 to 2070 with climate data projected by five global circulation models according to the Representative Concentration Pathway 4.5 scenario. The model projects that yield losses due to high air temperatures and water deficit will increase, while losses due to frost will decrease. Nevertheless, extra losses are offset by the CO2 fertilization effect, resulting in a small net increase of the average Brazilian Arabica coffee yield of 0.8% to 1.48 t ha(-1) in 2040-2070, assuming growing locations and irrigation remain unchanged.”

According to the news editors, the research concluded: “Simulations further indicate that future yields can reach up to 1.81 t ha(-1) provided that irrigation use is expanded.”

For more information on this research see: Carbon dioxide fertilization offsets negative impacts of climate change on Arabica coffee yield in Brazil. Climatic Change, 2017;144(4):671-685. Climatic Change can be contacted at: Springer, Van Godewijckstraat 30, 3311 Gz Dordrecht, Netherlands. (Springer – www.springer.com; Climatic Change – www.springerlink.com/content/0165-0009/)

The news correspondents report that additional information may be obtained from P.C. Sentelhas, University of Sao Paulo, Dept. of Biosyst Engn, ESALQ, Piracicaba, Brazil. Additional authors for this research include N.P.R. Anten and F.Y.F. Verhage.

The direct object identifier (DOI) for that additional information is: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-017-2068-z. This DOI is a link to an online electronic document that is either free or for purchase, and can be your direct source for a journal article and its citation.

(c) 2017 NewsRx LLC

 

To Top