Microwaving your tea will make it taste nicer – and here’s why …

Microwaving your tea will make it taste nicer – and here’s why. Dr Quan Vuong from the … Enter your postcode to see news and information near you. Community …

There was internet uproar after David Tennant’s character did it in a recent episode of Broadchurch.

But according to scientists it seems making or reheating a mug of tea in the microwave isn’t as nasty as it sounds, reports the Mirror.

Dr Quan Vuong from the University of Newcastle in New South Wales, Australia, has been researching green and black tea – and how the drinks are enhanced by a blast in the microwave.

Dr Vuong said doing so can “extract, isolate, and purify the important components”, ABC Australia reports.

The researcher’s experiments found that microwaving cuppas actives 80 percent of the caffeine, theanine, and polyphenol compounds.

These, science proclaims, are the things that generate the flavour in tea we adore so much.

Polyphenols are antioxidants which are linked to good health properties like lowered cardiovascular disease and lower cholesterol, hypertension and diabetes.

Theanine is an essential amino acid that promotes relaxation and can be found in tea, some other plant foods and mushrooms.

How to make the perfect brew

  1. Put hot water in the cup with your teabag.
  2. Heat in the microwave for 30 seconds on half power.
  3. Let it sit for a minute.
(Photo: Duncan Gibbons)

But be careful because the handle might be very hot.

Dr Vuong said the health benefits are linked to high consumption or equivalent to more than three cups of tea a day.

The method can apply to herbal teas and loose tea leaves, he said.

Dr Vuong’s speciality is adding value to natural products.

He’s done similar work with foods such as macadamia nuts and lemon pomace (the aroma).

He works to intensify antioxidants, boost flavour, and reduce waste.

But while Dr Vuong probably knows exactly what he’s doing the method of microwaving tea doesn’t sit well with Brits.

One Twitter user called the suggestion “heresy,” while another equated it to “hooliganism”.

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